Category Archives: Features

In the fourth of our editors’ picks, Ray Radford picks David Robertson’s interview with David Wilson on ‘Spiritualism and Shamanism’ which “helped me realise that my burgeoning interest was in religions that were off the beaten track (so to speak) and that there was so much out there that I can (and will and indeed at the moment, do) study.”

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In the third of our editors’ picks, David Robertson picks “the interview that I wished I had done. Reading Tim Fitzgerald’s The Ideology of Religious Studies (2000) as an undergrad was part of a seismic shift in my perspective, from an interest in religions to an interest in ‘religion’ […]. This is a dense interview that rewards another listen.”

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In the second of our summer “Editors’ Picks”, Sammy Bishop flags up an important interview in which Dawn Llewellyn provides a great introduction to how feminism, religion, and the academic study of both, might (or indeed, might not) interact. Llewellyn also does an excellent job of flagging up how future work in these fields could become more productively interdisciplinary.

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In the first of our summer “Editors’ Picks”, Chris Cotter flags up an important interview, in which Jack Tsonis “demonstrates how the term ‘Axial Age’ shares much in common with the notion of ‘World Religions’ in that both – to quote the subtitle to Tomoko Masuzawa’s seminal work – preserve ‘European universalism […] in the language of pluralism’.”

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In the last feature of the “semester” we’re continuing with the video format. A couple of months ago the RSP attended the Open University’s conference on Contemporary Religion in Historical Perspectives. I went about asking the pundits a couple of questions about Religion and its Publics. This week we have the

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In this second of a two-part series, Richard Ascough adds his voice to Sharday Mosurinjohn’s reflections on a new blog post assignment used in a course on Spirituality, Secularity, and Nonreligion taught through the School of Religion at Queen’s University. In the earlier post, Sharday noted that she learned two key lessons: that students are concerned about what it means to be “critical” in a public posting and that they do not have a level of digital literacy that one might expect in a generation that grew up fully immersed in digital technologies. In this follow-up post, Sharday and Richard discuss strengths and weaknesses in students’ digital literacy and explore how understanding one of the weaknesses might actually help us understand a particularly troublesome religious studies concept – what they consider a “threshold concept.”

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A Response to “Muslim Superheroes”
by Kemal Budak

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A Response to “Worldviews and Ways of Life”
by Alex Uzdavines

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In this first post of a two-part series Sharday Mosurinjohn reflects on the outcome of a new assignment that was intended to invite students to write in a way that was both familiar to their usual online communication (short and social media-based) and scholarly. The results led her to rethink the meaning of “authentic learning” (pedagogical approaches that empower learners to collaborate with one another – and in this case, professional scholars – to engage real-world complex problems) when it comes to digital information and communication technologies. In the second post, she and colleague Richard Ascough (School of Religion, Queen’s University) will discuss strengths and weaknesses in students’ digital literacy and explore how understanding one of the weaknesses might actually help us understand a particularly troublesome religious studies concept – what they consider a “threshold concept.”

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A Response to “Drone Metal Mysticism” by Owen Coggins
Francis Stewart

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A Response to “Stereotyping Religion: Critical Approaches to Pervasive Clichés”
by Christopher F. Silver

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A Responses to “Why do we believe? Evolution, Primates, and the Human Niche”
by Tenzan  Eaghll

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This week we’ve got something a little different for the Features segment. A couple of months ago the RSP attended the Open University’s conference on Contemporary Religion in Historical Perspectives. We thought this would be a great opportunity to do another RSP video! This time we decided to do something

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A response to “The BASR and the Impact of Religious Studies”
By Jonathan Tuckett

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A response to “Good Grief? Rituals of World Repairing”
by Douglas Davies

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